Ask The Designer: Design without Content?

Stuff.jpg

We are reminded by Joe Pulizzi of Content Marketing Institute that content without design is just stuff! But, we should also note that design without content is hardly more than an empty page.

So, when the client asks to design a layout for content to be inserted later, you might consider the following responses.

The designer is thinking – “Of course, not a problem at all. You have no content whatsoever, no idea about colors, not a slogan and not even a title idea. I’ll have absolutely no idea what it should look like. Maybe I could insert some doll faces and curly cues and mock up the text in Comic Sans. I’m sure that will work perfectly with what you had in mind, Right?”

What we really want to say is, “Go elsewhere and stop wasting my time!”

However, to be civil and polite, “I do need to know what the content will be and what objectives you have in mind before an actual layout template can be designed.”

#makestuffbeautiful #dinasdesktop

Be Inspired… Designer Quotes

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“Design is the application of intent – the opposite of happenstance and an antidote to accident.”

Robert L. Peters

 

#dinasdesktop

Ask The Designer: Feedback Cliches?

 

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Rest assured, graphic designers are professionals and can handle your criticisms.  We do realize that you won’t find everything flowers and sunshine on the first few drafts.  However, we did sweat and cry over that project, so just please be considerate.  And be specific.  Vagueness, cliches or overused feedback simply doesn’t help. If I hear “make it pop” one more time, really I just might pop a cap! Okay, maybe not quite.  But cliches can sure send my head into a spin.

Rather than saying, “make the logo bigger,” try using phrases such as, “The logo needs more emphasis.” Or “The logo is difficult to see.”  Solid feedback will endear you to your graphic designer as their best client ever and your design project will be all the more successful and strong.

#dinasdesktop

Ask The Designer: Color Choices?

colorwheeleye

Choosing a graphic design project’s colors in 3 steps.

1. DEFINE the project and the audience.

  • Consider the elements within the project such as typography and graphic icons or shapes.
  • Consider the viewing location and the demographics of the audience.

2. DISCOVER colors relevant to the industry represented by the project.

  • Resource sites such as colourlovers.com and color.adobe.com offer a plethara of color schemes for inspiration.
  • Seek inspiration from images related to the project to visualize color schemes in real life settings.

3. DEVELOP the color scheme by styling the project with sample palettes.

  • Sort and cull the sampled color combinations to narrow down the selection to the best 3-5 possibilities.
  • Refine the combinations using a color wheel to define complementary color groups, compound color groups or contrasting color groups.

Sampling the best picks and experimenting with a few combinations will help find the one that feels right.

#dinasdesktop

Be inspired: by animation

edenshorts

Be inspired by a little animation at Eden Shorts Competition.  Dina’s Desktop can make something just as beautiful for you! #dinasdesktop

Ask The Designer: Or Better, How NOT to Fly a drone!

dronecrash

If only I had a mountain climber handy when my drone went rogue! Or a tree climber may have been better suited in my case.  At least this high flyer was recovered. Sigh.

And for tips on flying your drone, check out this class at Learn How To Fly A Drone

learntofly

#dinasdesktop #multimediadesign #drones

Be inspired – or burn?

“Those who don’t build, burn.” – Ray Bradbury
buildorburn
#dinasdesktop